Hello, I'm Joey Lee.


Interaction designer & technologist.

Currently

Based in Brooklyn, NY

Working as an interaction designer, creative technologist, and educator.

Teaching

New York University | Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP)

Thinking about

Generative design & geography, machine learning, data collection systems, climate change, urban climates, open source & access, visualization, algorithmic ethics, critical mapping, & education.

A mobile system to monitor and map CO2 emissions in urban environments

About

From 2013 - 2016, I was funded to pursue research developing new methods of monitoring and modeling urban CO2 emissions. UBC has a long tradition of expertise in the field of urban climatology (as well as one of world’s top programs in Human Geography) and I was fortunate to have the opportunity to work with Dr. Andreas Christen, an atmospheric scientist, designer, and quite possibly one of the most supportive and inspirational people I’ve had the pleasure of working with.

In 2017, my research was published in the journal, Atmospheric Measurement Techniques. The article catalogs the novel approach and findings from the experiments I carried out as part of my thesis. The work showed that the use of mobile vehicles (cars and bikes) can used to monitor microscale CO2 concentrations and, when combined with complementary eddy-flux measurements and condusive weather conditions, CO2 emissions can be derived using an aerodynamic resistance approach. Crucial to note is the importance of weather conditions in influencing the results of this methodology to correctly attribute emissions. You can read more about the methods and findings in the links below.

This project speaks to a deeper need for critical engagement with data and sensing, especially in urban, complex environments. In this work, the sensors and hardware to make this data collection possible were rigorously tested. The testing revealed that even research grade, high resolution and accuracy sensors drift, have their own quirks, and respond differently to unforseen circumstances. The biggest takeaway from this work is that: there’s no small task.

You can explore the data from the experiments in this interactive visualization here ✨.

Credits

Thesis Committee